Welcome to the 2nd Fruit Delivery of 2014 Extended Season; Nov 19, 20, 21 & 22

Enjoy this mixed apple, pear, cranberry and pomegranate box over the Thanksgiving Holiday. If you would like more fresh cranberries before Thanksgiving, be sure to order our straight boxes of cranberries that include 6 pints or 12 pints.

If you are looking for the perfect gift this holiday, we will pack and deliver it for you anywhere in the lower 48 states! Our awesome customers love to use FruitShare for client gifting, saying thank you, get well, thinking of you, you rock, good luck . . . Whatever the occasion, delicious organic fruit is about sharing your joy and gratitude . . . “Healthy People Healthy Planet”.

Thanks for your support of organic orchards.

Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare™

 

In Your Box

Yoinashi asian pears and Concorde pears

Honeycrisp, Sweet Orin, and Braeburn apples

Cranberries

Pomegranates.

Storage and Ripening
Yoinashi asian pears are ready to eat right out of the box or you can leave them in the refrigerator like an apple and enjoy over a couple weeks. Your pears will need between 4-7 days on the counter/fruit bowl to give to thumb pressure by the stem. To speed up their ripening process you can place some in a paper bag with a banana, but remember to “check the neck” every day. The banana gives off ethylene gas that ripens fruit faster. You can always place your pears in the refrigerator to slow down the ripening process and enjoy over a longer period of time. Keep your apples and cranberries in the coldest part of your refrigerator. They are ready to eat right away. They will stay crispiest when stored as cold as 34 degrees F. Pomegranates can be left on the counter but the skin will dry out if left to long. You can keep them in your refrigerator to enjoy over a longer period of time.

What It Takes

Ignacio “Nacho” Sanchez and his wife, Casamira, provided the pomegranates in your box. For Nacho and Casamira, farming started as a side business in 1989 when they bought their first 6-acre orchard in Cutler, California. But over the next four years, Nacho’s orchard expanded rapidly, and he made his passion for farming into his full-time job. When their twin girls were born in 1991, Nacho and Casamira named their orchard Twin Girls Farms; and when their third daughter arrived, Nacho named some varieties of peaches after her. Having converted to organic farming practices in 1999, Nacho uses beneficial insects and cover crops in place of conventional chemicals. He gets great satisfaction from the knowledge that no harmful chemicals can affect his family, his workers, his customers and our environment.

Here I include “the art of eating a pomegranate”. Wear an old shirt. Stay away from anything white and put on some glasses. Score the outside of the skin with a knife length wise and break it apart. This is when you run the risk of tiny red seeds staining your clothes or rolling around the floor to be stepped on later. Now pull the white membranes away and expose a cluster of red berries. Eat directly from the fruit or be more polite and pick the berries into a bowl to consume later. Do not eat the white membrane/peel only eat the berries. It’s a riot to sit around the kitchen table at our house and eat this wonderful fruit. It comes and goes each year before you know it so give thanks. I know these aren’t the prettiest pomegranates due to limbs rubbing the skin and scaring the outer fruit–but this does not affect the inside. Here is a new word you add to your lexicon: Arils – this is the name of the red edible seeds that you eat in a pomegranate. Note: These are one of the fruits highest in antioxidants. Enjoy guilt free.

The Stewart brothers provided Sweet Orin and Braeburn apples in your box today. Sweet Orin is a yellow apple variety developed in Japan where it is considered a special delicacy.  It is customary in Japan to slice and share these apples with family and friends following meals on special occasions. Many describe the taste of Sweet Orin as sweet fresh and a bit of heaven. Make sure to slice these up and share with special people in your life. The Stewarts orchard is situated near Hood River, Oregon and is one of the most beautiful orchards you’ll ever see.  With Mount Hood as a backdrop and the Columbia River flowing just below the orchard they know what it means to protect the environment. Ronny and Jimmy have been working on the family farm near Hood River since they were children. But there wouldn’t have ever been a family farm if their parents, Ron and Cheryl, hadn’t decided to sell their dry-cleaning business and start an organic fruit farm. For many years, Ron was the only organic farmer on the National Commission for Small Farms. His knowledge about organics and farming were passed down to Ronny and Jimmy, who took over the farm in 2003. Since then, the brothers have expanded the farm to include many varieties of pears, apples and more. They have found that one of the best things to do is create a natural loop in the production process. They do this by composting cast-off fruit and peels, then using the composted material to keep the soil rich and fertile. It’s a sustainable way to reduce waste and keep the farm running properly so they can continue growing outstanding fruit. Enjoy all three varieties of apples as snacks, in baking or even on salads. They go great with spinach, walnuts and a balsamic dressing.

This week’s Asian pears (Yoinashi variety and Concorde pears and Honeycrisp apples are from the Stennes family. Like many of our organic growers, the Stennes family farm in Washington’s Cascade Mountains is a family affair. The farm began in 1894, when the Stennes family emmigrated from Norway and planted apple trees on their homestead. Now, Keith is joined by his twin sons, Mark and Kevin to make up the third and fourth generations of Stennes farmers. They have grown the orchard to include not just apples, but also cherries, pluots, plums, and pears. Yoinashi asian pears in my opinion are what an asian pear is supposed to be. My daughter when she first tried one several years ago said, “it tastes like a juice box”. You get the crisp of an apple and the sweet juice, of well, a juice box. In some parts of Asia they are greatly appreciated as a symbol of beauty, longevity and wisdom. We got as much of this limited crop for you as we could and hope you will appreciate this gift. Concordes are known for their sweetness and juiciness, as well as their tall, beautiful shape. The yellow-green skin, and can be eaten while crisp, making them a unique variety because you don’t need to wait for them to soften! I prefer then when they give to slight pressure.  They are at their juiciest and sweetest at this time.  Concorde pears are perfectly suited for slicing on a cheese plate or into a fresh salad because they don’t turn brown when sliced like most pears.

Health and Wellness

We wish you a good Thanksgiving.  Remember to keep your body healthy during the stress of travel and colder days.  Get plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables to replenish your body’s stores of essential vitamins and minerals. Some nutrients are drained more quickly when you are under stress, so eating healthy is especially important. Exercise is also a great way to combat stress. Physical activity relieves stress and aggression, plus releases endorphins into your system, which gives the feeling of happiness – the feeling some people call a “runner’s high.”

Did you know that cranberries and pomegranates are a superfood? They are chock-full of antioxidants, vitamin C and fiber and they only have about 45 calories in a cup. According to WebMD, “cranberries outrank nearly every fruit and vegetable–including strawberries, spinach, broccoli, red grapes, apples, raspberries, and cherries.” In fact, cranberries outrank all other fruits and veggies except for blueberries in terms of antioxidant content! It’s just another great reason (other than the delicious flavor, of course!) to enjoy plenty of cranberries this fall. They’ll help you stay healthy all through the holidays! 

Recipes

Sugarless Cranberry Sauce

2 bags of fresh cranberries (they are usually 12 ounce bags)

¾ cup pineapple juice or orange juice (I recommend pineapple!)

½ cup of applesauce (no sugar added)

½ cup of water

juice and zest of one orange

3-4 Tablespoons of honey or to taste (optional)
Put cranberries, pineapple juice, applesauce and water in a sauce pan and and bring to a boil. Keep on medium heat, stirring constantly until the cranberries start to explode (about 10-15 minutes). Reduce to a simmer and pour the juice and zest over the cranberry mixture. Simmer 10-15 minutes and remove from heat. Cool completely and store in fridge at least 4 hours but preferably overnight before serving.

NOTE: This is not as sweet as store versions! Taste at the end of cooking. It is naturally sweet from the fruit juice and applesauce but you can add more honey or stevia to taste if needed.

Courtesy of wellnessmama.com

Recipe #2 Apple Pomegranate Kale Salad with Lemon Vinaigrette (a perfect early winter salad enjoy!)

Ingredients: 2 tablespoons champagne vinegar, 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, 1 tablespoon honey, 1 small shallot, minced, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, 1 pound lacinato kale, washed and dried, 1 honeycrisp or similar apple, thinly sliced, 1 cup pomegranate arils, 1/4 cup feta cheese, 1 small shallot, thinly sliced

Instructions: In a medium bowl or cup, whisk together the champagne vinegar, lemon juice, honey, shallot, salt, and pepper. Slowly drizzle the olive oil into the mixture while whisking to emulsify. Set aside. Remove the rib of each piece of kale. Cut the kale into thin strips, 1/4″ wide. Using your hands, squeeze the strips tightly to bruise. Pour the dressing over the kale and toss to coat. Allow to sit for at least 10 minutes before topping. When the kale has marinated, add in the apple slices, pomegranate arils, feta, and shallot. Toss to combine and serve immediately. Courtesy of The Art of Simple

Got a favorite recipe or comment you want to share? Become a fan on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/FruitShareOrganics?fref=ts), follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/FruitShare), and check out our blog (FruitShare.wordpress.com) pages. Good old-fashioned email works, too, at comments@FruitShare.com

Welcome to the 1st Fruit Delivery of 2014 Extended Season; Nov 5, 6, 7 & 8

 

It looks like November is setting up for a beautiful variety of apples, pears, citrus and even cranberries again this year. The weather has been better this year for our apple and pear growers as well as the cranberry bogs. Enjoy this mixed apple and pear box and look forward to some cranberries mixed in before Thanksgiving. Soon thereafter you’ll see the first of the Rio Star grapefruit, stem and leaf clementines and other delicious citrus that appear throughout the winter season.

Also if you are looking for the perfect gift we can pack up organic fruit boxes and deliver them anywhere for you over the Holidays.

Thanks for your support of organic orchards.

 

Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare

 

In Your Box

Yoinashi asian pears

Honeycrisp, Ambrosia, Sweet Orin, Braeburn, Fuji apples

D’Anjou, and Concorde pears

Storage and Ripening
Yoinashi asian pears are ready to eat right out of the box or you can leave them in the refrigerator like an apple and enjoy over a couple weeks. Your pears will need between 4-7 days on the counter/fruit bowl to give to thumb pressure by the stem. To speed up their ripening process you can place some in a paper bag with a banana, but remember to “check the neck” every day. The banana gives off ethylene gas that ripens fruit faster. You can always place your pears in the refrigerator to slow down the ripening process and enjoy over a longer period of time. Keep your apples in the coldest part of your refrigerator. They are ready to eat right away. They will stay crispiest when stored as cold as 34 degrees F.

What It Takes

The Stewart brothers provided Sweet Orin and Braeburn apples in your box today. Sweet Orin is a yellow apple variety developed in Japan where it is considered a special delicacy.  It is customary in Japan to slice and share these apples with family and friends following meals on special occasions. These apples along with Honeycrisp are favorites of our customers. Many describe the taste of Sweet Orin as sweet fresh and a bit of heaven. Make sure to slice these up and share with special people in your life. The Stewarts orchard is situated near Hood River, Oregon and is one of the most beautiful orchards you’ll ever see.  With Mount Hood as a backdrop and the Columbia River flowing just below the orchard they know what it means to protect the environment. Ronny and Jimmy have been working on the family farm near Hood River since they were children. But there wouldn’t have ever been a family farm if their parents, Ron and Cheryl, hadn’t decided to sell their dry-cleaning business and start an organic fruit farm. For many years, Ron was the only organic farmer on the National Commission for Small Farms. His knowledge about organics and farming were passed down to Ronny and Jimmy, who took over the farm in 2003. Since then, the brothers have expanded the farm to include many varieties of pears, apples and more. They have found that one of the best things to do is create a natural loop in the production process. They do this by composting cast-off fruit and peels, then using the composted material to keep the soil rich and fertile. It’s a sustainable way to reduce waste and keep the farm running properly so they can continue growing outstanding fruit. Enjoy all three varieties of apples as snacks, in baking or even on salads. They go great with spinach, walnuts and a balsamic dressing. 

This week’s Asian (Yoinashi variety), D’Anjou and Concorde pears, as well as, the Honeycrisp, Fuji and Ambrosia apples are from the Stennes family. Like many of our organic growers, the Stennes family farm in Washington’s Cascade Mountains is a family affair. The farm began in 1894, when the Stennes family emmigrated from Norway and planted apple trees on their homestead. Now, Keith is joined by his twin sons, Mark and Kevin to make up the third and fourth generations of Stennes farmers. They have grown the orchard to include not just apples, but also cherries, pluots, plums, and of course, pears. This week they’ve provided some great pears. Concordes are known for their sweetness and juiciness, as well as their tall, beautiful shape. It has green skin and sometimes a hint of yellow, and can be eaten while crisp – it will still be sweet and delicious!  Concorde pears are perfectly suited for slicing on a cheese plate or into a fresh salad because they don’t turn brown when sliced like most pears. I still prefer them most when they are soft at the neck. D’Anjou pears are a popular variety that are easily recognized by their egg-shaped appearance. These pears skin will not change color as they ripen, so don’t wait around for them to change – remember to “check the neck” to gauge their ripeness; when they give to soft pressure, they are ready to eat. D’Anjou pears are great for most recipes, because they are juicy and fresh tasting. They can be used for baking, grilling or poaching, and they are great sliced in salads. Yoinashi asian pears in my opinion are what an asian pear is supposed to be. My daughter when she first tried one several years ago said, “it tastes like a juice box”. You get the crisp of an apple and the sweet juice, of well, a juice box. In some parts of Asia they are greatly appreciated as a symbol of beauty, longevity and wisdom. We got as much of this limited crop for you as we could and hope you will appreciate this gift.

Health and Wellness

Several recent studies are proving what we should already know. Exercising is good for the brain not just your body. Recent research presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress show the brain-boosting effects of just four months of exercise. “It’s reassuring to know that you can at least partially prevent that [cognitive] decline by exercising and losing weight,” study researcher Dr. Martin Juneau, director of prevention of the Montreal Heart Institute, said in a statement. The study included overweight and sedentary adults with an average age of 49. They underwent twice-weekly sessions of intense interval training for four weeks, which included circuit weights and exercise bikes, before and after which they underwent tests of their cognitive functioning, cardiac output, body composition and exercise tolerance and capacity. By the end of the study, the researchers found that not only were the participants’ body measurements all improved. They also did better on the tests of cognitive functioning. “At least 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per week can make a huge difference to manage risk factors for heart disease and stroke,” Dr. Beth Abramson, spokesperson for the Heart and Stroke Foundation, said in a statement. There are many benefits of exercise. We know it can make us feel better. These studies suggest it can make us think better as well. Courtesy of huffingtonpost.com

Recipe

Rustic Pear & Apple Galette

Crust

2 cups white flour

3/4 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon white sugar

14 tablespoons unsalted butter

1/3-1/2 cup ice water
Fruit

2 large apples, peeled and cored

3-4 red pears, peeled and cored

Juice of 1 lemon

1/3 cup dark brown sugar

1 tablespoon flour

1 teaspoon fresh cinnamon

1 teaspoon fresh coriander

1/2 teaspoon fresh nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon ginger

2 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons cinnamon sugar
Heat the oven to 425ºF. Pulse the flour, salt, sugar and butter in a food processor until crumbly. Slowly add the ice water just until it comes together in a dough. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate while you prepare the fruit. Thinly slice the apples and pears and toss with the lemon juice, brown sugar, flour and spices. Take the dough out of the fridge and gently pat onto a lightly greased large round pizza pan, or rectangular baking sheet. This is rustic pastry – don’t worry too much about the look of it! Lay the fruit out in overlapping circles or rows, then fold the pastry up around the edges. Dot with butter and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar. Bake for about 50 minutes or until browned and crispy on the bottom. Cool to room temperature and serve with cinnamon whipped cream or caramel sauce.

Courtesy of thekitchn.com
Got a favorite recipe or comment you want to share? Become a fan on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/FruitShareOrganics?fref=ts), follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/FruitShare), and check out our blog (FruitShare.wordpress.com) pages. Good old-fashioned email works, too, at comments@FruitShare.com

Welcome to the 10th Fruit Delivery of 2014; Oct 22 & 23

While walking in the prairie we planted at the farm 16 years ago a visitor asked me what I think is the cause of honey bee population decline.  First of all, it is always nice to know more and more people are becoming aware of the decline in important pollinators in nature.  I’ve spent a lot of time walking in orchards and row cropped fields.  What I know is organic agriculture promotes healthy soils, healthy plants, healthy ecosystems and healthy people.  Organic fields are teaming with life and biodiversity which help grow the healthiest and tastiest food.  

In contrast, greenhouses are spraying insecticides on bedding plants in winter and spring. These same plants we plant around our houses in the late spring. Bee populations are most vulnerable during this time and when they go to get pollen from these toxic flowers they just bring the toxins back to their hives.  I believe this is just one cause of the honey bee decline. There are many more cases just like this that affect bee populations.  Just think how the chemicals we’ve introduced into our food system, homes, yards, workplaces, and even fabrics might be affecting other parts of the life cycle.  This is just one more reason FruitShare fruit is always organic.
Enjoy and To Your Health,

Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare™

In your box

Sweet Orin, Honeycrisp and Ambrosia apples

Red D’Anjou, Concorde and Asian pears

Storage and Ripening

Take all of your pears out of the box right away. Store them on the counter at room temperature. Test ripeness by checking the neck, or pressing gently on the pear near the stem. When the pear gives to gentle thumb pressure, the pear will be juicy and soft. This is the best way to check pears because they ripen from the inside out, and pressing near the stem gets you closer to the center of the fruit. Remember that pears are an ethylene-producing fruit; that means that they naturally produce a gas that will make them ripen faster. If you want to ripen up your pears quickly, put a few in a paper bag to trap the gas.  Once they give to thumb pressure you can refrigerate them, which lets you enjoy them over a longer period of time.  Keep the apples and Asian pears in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator to keep them fresh for several weeks.

What It Takes
This week’s Honeycrisp and Ambrosia apples, along with the Concorde and Asian pears are from the Stennes family. Like many of our organic growers, the Stennes family farm in Washington’s Cascade Mountains is a family affair. The farm began in 1894, when the Stennes family emmigrated from Norway and planted apple trees on their homestead. Now, Keith is joined by his twin sons, Mark and Kevin to make up the third and fourth generations of Stennes farmers. They have grown the orchard to include not just apples, but also cherries, pluots, plums, and of course, pears. This week they’ve provided some great pears. Concordes are known for their sweetness and juiciness, as well as their tall, beautiful shape. They have yellow-green skin, and can be eaten while crisp, making them a unique variety because you don’t need to wait for them to fully soften! If you do like a softer pear you can wait until they fully soften, by “Checking the Neck”, and you will enjoy all the complex juicy flavor they have to offer. Concorde pears are perfectly suited for slicing on a cheese plate or into a fresh salad because they don’t turn brown when sliced like most pears. Remember to “check the neck”. When they give to thumb pressure at the stem end they will be fully sweet and juicy.  Asian pears are more like an apple. They are crisp on the outside and juicy on the inside and ready to eat. The Red D’Anjou pears will add nice color to a salad or fruit bowl. Remember to “check the neck”. These really are best when they fully give to thumb pressure at the stem end.

The Stewart brothers provided Sweet Orin apples. Sweet Orin is a yellow apple variety developed in Japan where it is considered a special delicacy.  It is customary in Japan to slice and share these apples with family and friends following meals on special occasions. These apples along with Honeycrisp are favorites of our customers. Many describe the taste of Sweet Orin as sweet fresh and a bit of heaven. Make sure to slice these up and share with special people in your life. The Stewarts orchard is situated near Hood River, Oregon and is one of the most beautiful orchards you’ll ever see.  With Mount Hood as a backdrop and the Columbia River flowing just below the orchard they know what it means to protect the environment. Ronny and Jimmy have been working on the family farm near Hood River since they were children. But there wouldn’t have ever been a family farm if their parents, Ron and Cheryl, hadn’t decided to sell their dry-cleaning business and start an organic fruit farm. For many years, Ron was the only organic farmer on the National Commission for Small Farms. His knowledge about organics and farming were passed down to Ronny and Jimmy, who took over the farm in 2003. Since then, the brothers have expanded the farm to include many varieties of pears, apples and more. They have found that one of the best things to do is create a natural loop in the production process. They do this by composting cast-off fruit and peels, then using the composted material to keep the soil rich and fertile. It’s a sustainable way to reduce waste and keep the farm running properly so they can continue growing outstanding fruit. Enjoy all three varieties of apples as snacks, in baking or even on salads. They go great with spinach, walnuts and a balsamic dressing.

Health and Wellness

Do we really need to eat organic fruit? The short answer is “yes.” To explore why, let’s look at apples, which are currently in season. According to whatsonmyfood.org, no less than 42 different pesticide residues were found on apples during the USDA Pesticide Data Program. These include:

7 known or probable cancer-causing chemicals (known as “carcinogens”)

19 chemicals that are suspected to disrupt hormones

10 neurotoxins

6 developmental or reproductive toxins

17 honeybee toxins

Let’s not forget that pesticides and herbicides were specifically created to kill or render pests harmless…and those same chemicals are not just harmful to the critters they are meant for, but also to us. Eating organic ensures that when you bite into that crunchy apple, you’re not eating harmful chemicals – but just a simple, healthy apple. And providing healthy, chemical-free fruit is what FruitShare is all about.

Recipe

Jen’s Kale Slaw with Pears and Avocado (My wife’s friend Jennifer Holloway developed this recipe and it is a winner!)

2 bunches of kale stripped off the stem—roughly chopped and lightly steamed (then chopped finer)

2 carrots grated

1 cup shredded cabbage (red or nappa)

½ red onion chopped (soaked to take away strong flavor)

1 pear sliced/chopped

1 avocado diced

Dressing—mix separately first

1 T Dijon Mustard, 3 T Olive Oil, 2-3 T Apple Cider Vinegar (white, or champagne will also work).

Combine above ingredients and enjoy. You can also prep a larger batch of the kale/carrot/cabbage/onion and keep it in the fridge. Adding pear, avocado, and dressing upon serving.
Got a favorite recipe or comment you want to share? Become a fan on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/FruitShareOrganics?fref=ts), follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/FruitShare), and check out our blog (FruitShare.wordpress.com) pages. Good old-fashioned email works, too, at comments@FruitShare.com

Welcome to the 9th Fruit Delivery of 2014; Oct 8, 9, 10 & 11

This week’s box is full of sweet, crunchy and juicy fruit. It is so satisfying you’ll probably be able to reduce the amount of food and calories you typically eat. Each piece of fruit has under 100 calories – and with all the fiber, minerals, vitamins and water you can’t go wrong. Carry these incredibly portable fruit with you and see how easy it is to snack healthy throughout the day.

Here are some of the reason pears are so great for you. Pears contain two of three antioxidants thatthat are thought to decrease risk of type 2 diabetes. Pears contain more fiber than almost all other fruits, with 22% of your recommended daily intake. They also contain about 12% of your recommended daily vitamin C. They are a good source of vitamin B2, C, E, copper, and potassium. Pears contain more pectin than apples, which helps keep your cholesterol levels in check. Fresh pears are considered “hypo-allergenic” because people with food allergies can often enjoy pears without having a reaction. They are low glycemic, which means the carbs in pears are slow to convert to sugar – so you don’t get a sugar high and crash, which can wreak havoc on your body.  

Enjoy,
Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare™

 

In your box

Honeycrisp and Ambrosia apples

Red D’Anjou, Concorde and Asian pears

Crimson Grapes

Storage and Ripening

Take all of your pears out of the box right away. Store them on the counter at room temperature. Test ripeness by checking the neck, or pressing gently on the pear near the stem. When the pear gives to gentle thumb pressure, the pear will be juicy and soft. This is the best way to check pears because they ripen from the inside out, and pressing near the stem gets you closer to the center of the fruit. Remember that pears are an ethylene-producing fruit; that means that they naturally produce a gas that will make them ripen faster. If you want to ripen up your pears quickly, put a few in a paper bag to trap the gas.  Once they give to thumb pressure you can refrigerate them, which lets you enjoy them over a longer period of time.  Keep the apples and Asian pears in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator to keep them fresh for several weeks. Store your grapes in the coldest part of the refrigerator. Only wash them right before you eat them, as moisture can contribute to molding. If the grapes arrive damp take them out of their package and dry them off with a paper towel and then put them back in their bag and refrigerate.
What It Takes
This week’s Honeycrisp and Ambrosia apples, along with the Concorde and Asian pears are from the Stennes family. Like many of our organic growers, the Stennes family farm in Washington’s Cascade Mountains is a family affair. The farm began in 1894, when the Stennes family emmigrated from Norway and planted apple trees on their homestead. Now, Keith is joined by his twin sons, Mark and Kevin to make up the third and fourth generations of Stennes farmers. They have grown the orchard to include not just apples, but also cherries, pluots, plums, and of course, pears. This week they’ve provided some great pears. Concordes are known for their sweetness and juiciness, as well as their tall, beautiful shape. They have yellow-green skin, and can be eaten while crisp, making them a unique variety because you don’t need to wait for them to fully soften! If you do like a softer pear you can wait until they fully soften, by “Checking the Neck”, and you will enjoy all the complex juicy flavor they have to offer. Concorde pears are perfectly suited for slicing on a cheese plate or into a fresh salad because they don’t turn brown when sliced like most pears. Remember to “check the neck”.  When they give to thumb pressure at the stem end they will be fully sweet and juicy.  Asian pears are more like an apple.  They are crisp on the outside and juicy on the inside and ready to eat.

The Crimson grapes this week are from Three Sisters Farm, owned by Joe and Johnni. Located near Fresno, CA, they use beneficial grasses and flowers – especially poppies – as cover crops, making their vineyard exceptionally beautiful. Three Sisters has been certified organic since 1981, but even before Joe and Johnni began farming, Joe’s parents owned the farm. Some of the vines are over 80 years old!

Health and Wellness

It’s that time of year, and it seems like the flu and some nasty colds are making the rounds. Never fear, FruitShare is here! Eating at least five servings of fruits (1 of our apples and pears is actually 3 servings) and vegetables per day is a great way to stay healthy. Fruit provides essential vitamins and nutrients that keep your body and immune system strong. Incorporating fruit into your daily diet is easy. Simply keep a bowl of pears out on the table or counter, grab them for snacks or send them to school in your kids’ lunches. Add pears to your dinners by slicing them into salads, or serving them sliced for dessert. These sweet treats can help prepare your body’s immune system to fight against colds and the flu, so you can get right back out there to enjoy all the good that fall has to offer.
Recipe

Pear, Greens, Parmesan and Walnut Salad

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1 tablespoon dry Sherry

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

8 cups of mixed baby greens or spinach (about 4 ounces)

1 cup fresh Parmesan shavings (about 2 ounces)

1 large firm Bosc pear, peeled, halved, cored, cut crosswise into thin slices (about 8 ounces)

1/3 cup walnuts, toasted (about 1 1/2 ounces)

1 shallot, peeled, thinly sliced
Whisk mustard, Sherry, and red wine vinegar in medium bowl to blend. Gradually add oil, whisking until well blended. Season dressing with salt and pepper.

Toss greens, Parmesan, pear, walnuts, and shallot in large bowl to combine. Toss with enough dressing to coat. Divide among plates and serve.

Courtesy of bonappetit.com
Got a favorite recipe or comment you want to share? Become a fan on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/FruitShareOrganics?fref=ts), follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/FruitShare), and check out our blog (FruitShare.wordpress.com) pages. Good old-fashioned email works, too, at comments@FruitShare.com

Welcome to the 8th Fruit Delivery of 2014; Sept 24 & 25

Have you ever tried cutting out a lot of food items out of your diet? Every fall over the course of several days I like to get my diet down to just apples, pears, vegetables and water. I crave some sugary treats and crunchy chips at first but then I find myself replacing these cravings with a sweet Honeycrisp apple or a juicy Concorde pear more than satisfies these cravings and gives me more consistent energy throughout the day. Since we are heading into peak of apple and pear season I’m sticking with my handy fruit snacks to maintain a healthy blood sugar throughout the day. If your interested in the specifics of this cleanse let me know.

Here are some of the reason pears are so great for you. Pears contain two of three antioxidants that are thought to decrease risk of type 2 diabetes. Pears contain more fiber than almost all other fruits, with 22% of your recommended daily intake. They also contain about 12% of your recommended daily vitamin C. They are a good source of vitamin B2, C, E, copper, and potassium. Pears contain more pectin than apples, which helps keep your cholesterol levels in check. Fresh pears are considered “hypo-allergenic” because people with food allergies can often enjoy pears without having a reaction. They are low glycemic, which means the carbs in pears are slow to convert to sugar – so you don’t get a sugar high and crash, which can wreak havoc on your body.

Enjoy,
Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare™

 In your box

Honeycrisp and Gala apples

Bartlett, Bosc and Concorde pears

Storage and Ripening

Take all of your pears out of the box right away. Store them on the counter at room temperature. Test ripeness by checking the neck, or pressing gently on the pear near the stem. When the pear gives to gentle thumb pressure, the pear will be juicy and soft. This is the best way to check pears because they ripen from the inside out, and pressing near the stem gets you closer to the center of the fruit. Remember that pears are an ethylene-producing fruit; that means that they naturally produce a gas that will make them ripen faster. If you want to ripen up your pears quickly, put a few in a paper bag to trap the gas.  Once they give to thumb pressure you can refrigerate them, which lets you enjoy them over a longer period of time.  Keep the apples in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator to keep them fresh for several weeks.

What It Takes

This week’s Honeycrisp, Gala, Bosc, Bartlett and Concorde pears are from the Stennes family. Like many of our organic growers, the Stennes family farm in Washington’s Cascade Mountains is a family affair. The farm began in 1894, when the Stennes family emmigrated from Norway and planted apple trees on their homestead. Now, Keith is joined by his twin sons, Mark and Kevin to make up the third and fourth generations of Stennes farmers. They have grown the orchard to include not just apples, but also cherries, pluots, plums, and of course, pears. This week they’ve provided some great pears. Concordes are known for their sweetness and juiciness, as well as their tall, beautiful shape. They have yellow-green skin, and can be eaten while crisp, making them a unique variety because you don’t need to wait for them to fully soften! If you do like a softer pear you can wait until they fully soften and you will enjoy all the complex juicy flavor they have to offer. Concorde pears are perfectly suited for slicing on a cheese plate or into a fresh salad because they don’t turn brown when sliced like most pears. Bosc pears are a distinctive variety with a crunchy-yet-tender flesh and sweet, spiced flavor. Don’t be deterred by their brown skin: the flesh is firm and spicier than other varieties. Bosc pears are more flavorful earlier in the ripening process. Enjoy their complex, sweet flavor before they have fully softened. When you test your Bosc pears to check their ripeness, keep in mind that their flesh is denser than other varieties. This means that when you “check the neck,” it will not give as much to pressure. Don’t wait around for these pears to get super soft; they’re ready to enjoy while they’re still firm. Because of this firm flesh, Bosc pears are great for baking, broiling and poaching. Their strong flavor is also less likely to be overwhelmed by spices such as cinnamon or nutmeg. The Bartlett pears are the classically pear-shaped fruit in the box with green to yellow-green skin. As they ripen, they turn from bright green to nearly all yellow. Remember to “check the neck”.  When they give to thumb pressure at the stem end they will be fully sweet and juicy.

David Bedford of the University of Minnesota developed the Honeycrisp apples with good old fashioned cross breeding over 20 years ago. It is the most popular apple we know of for eating fresh. It’s crisp sweet and tart combination along with the juicy crunch makes it a favorite. Bedford says that studied under an electron microscope, Honeycrisp cells are twice the size of other apples, which accounts for their unique, pleasing texture. The cells fill up with natural sugar water, which makes then delicious even to the core. We try to get you as many honeycrisp as we can every year, but they are always limited and their season is short so enjoy them while they last. Galas are a beautiful and delicious early season apple. They are great for eating out of hand but if you’re so inclined they make fantastic applesauce. Keep all your apples in the coolest part of your refrigerator to keep them crisp.

Health and Wellness

Great news! Eating the apples and pears in your box this week could help decrease your risk for type 2 diabetes – especially for women. It is known that certain antioxidants called flavonoids can help improve insulin sensitivity. There are three types of flavonoids that scientists are particularly interested in, and pears include two of them. While eating these antioxidants has been connected to decreased risk of type 2 diabetes in both men and women, a new analysis of the Nurses’ Health Study shows that the combination of flavonoids in apples and pears has the most consistent association with lower risk of diabetes. So dig in. This week’s box might as well be called the Flavonoid Box.

Recipe

I grew up enjoying this recipe. It is great for breakfast straight or as a topping on oatmeal, pancakes or waffles. In the evening it is a delicious dessert and it makes a great topping for vanilla ice cream if you really want to indulge.

Cinnamon Sauteed Apples & Pears

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

3 apples—peeled, cored and sliced 1/3 inch thick

2 pears—peeled, cored and sliced 1/3 inch thick

2 tablespoons light brown sugar (experiment you may be able to use less)

Pinch of cinnamon
In a large skillet, melt the butter. Add the apple and pear slices and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned in spots, about 5 minutes. Stir in the sugar and cinnamon, reduce the heat to low and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and lightly caramelized, about 10 minutes longer. Serve immediately or refrigerate overnight and rewarm before serving.

Courtesy of foodandwine.com
Got a favorite recipe or comment you want to share? Become a fan on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/FruitShareOrganics?fref=ts), follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/FruitShare), and check out our blog (FruitShare.wordpress.com) pages. Good old-fashioned email works, too, at comments@FruitShare.com

Welcome to the 7th Fruit Delivery of 2014; Sept 10 & 11

Signs of the end are summer are appearing all around me. Tomatoes and sweet corn have reached their peak. Kids are heading back to school and if you look closely there is that rogue tree changing color already. These early signs remind me that the fruit season will also be shifting soon from summer stone fruits to more apples and pears in the coming weeks. In this box the first apples of the season are from Colorado. Over the course of the fall we’ll see many varieties and always keep in the varieties that are at their peak of flavor. Thanks for your support and I hope you had a good Labor Day weekend and are settled in to your fall schedule!

To Your Health!

Everett Myers, Founder of FruitShare™

In Your Box

Colorado Gala apples

Colorado peaches

Dapple Dandy pluots

Thompson grapes

 

Storage and Ripening

Store your grapes in the coldest part of the refrigerator. Only wash them right before you eat them, as moisture can contribute to molding. If the grapes arrive damp take them out of their package and dry them off with a paper towel and then put them back in their bag and refrigerate. Keep your peaches out on the counter at room temperature until they give to gentle thumb pressure. Watch carefully, some might be ready to eat right out of the box. Once they give to thumb pressure you can refrigerate them too, which lets you enjoy them over a longer period of time First Gala apples of the year from Colorado is a sign of Fall coming. Keep these crisp in the coldest part of your refrigerator. The Dapple Dandy pluots you can eat right away and will keep well in your refrigerator. Don’t wait for them to get soft they are best a little firm.

 
What It Takes

Have you ever imagined quitting your job/career and becoming an orchardist?  This is exactly what Rosemerry, a poet and teacher, and Eric a builder and project manager did in 2007.  Living near Telluride at the time they would take drives on rural roads and noticed this beautiful land with an orchard that had fallen in disrepair.  They couldn’t get this land, 2 hours from where they were living, out of their mind.  Thinking they would fix up the buildings and sell it; they instead fell in love with the idea of becoming orchardists and followed through on their conviction.  They are now raising their two young children and taking care of fruit trees on 75 acres of land on the Western Slope of Colorado.  Now after 7 years of being full time organic orchardists they are harvesting some really nice crops.  We are fortunate to bring you the first picking of their 2014 Gala apple.  The fruit is small, but it is Colorado sweet because of the cold mountain nights that bring on more sugar than fruit grown in climates that don’t have the “chill hours”.

We also continue to get delicious organic peaches from Brant and Carol. They have a firm commitment to good land stewardship. They use a blend of old and new technology to keep their soil fertile, control pests, and keep their trees healthy and productive. One of their most successful techniques is simply being observant. Brant claims that if you are in your orchard all the time, and you really know your orchard, it’s possible to detect potential problems and nip them in the bud. It is the care that the whole Harrison family puts into their peaches that sets them apart. At their orchard on the western slopes of Colorado’s Rocky Mountains, it is a family affair. The whole family including their sons, parents and nephews, work side by side to grow these excellent peaches.  The mountainous location and unique climate of their farm make it perfect for growing delicious peaches. At almost 4800 ft. in elevation, the orchard’s water supply comes from melting snowpack high in the Rockies. This snowmelt joins the Colorado River and flows down the slope of Grand Mesa where the Brant and Carol tap into it to irrigate their orchards. The hot days and cool nights in their river valley bring the peaches to the peak of flavor and juiciness. Eat these quickly they are tree ripe and will be ready to eat when you get them or within just a day or two. They are delicious alone or sliced and served with any breakfast, cereal, waffles, pancakes. If they are getting to soft for you, wash the peach fuzz off of them, then slice them off the pit and put them in a freezer bag. We like to use these frozen peaches in a smoothie. They are also great for baking and grilling. Enjoy!

The Thompson grapes this week are from Three Sisters Farm, owned by Joe and Johnni. Located near Fresno, CA, they use beneficial grasses and flowers – especially poppies – as cover crops, making their vineyard exceptionally beautiful. Three Sisters has been certified organic since 1981, but even before Joe and Johnni began farming, Joe’s parents owned the farm. Some of the vines are over 80 years old! As the Thompson hang on the vine longer they develop more sugars and begin to change colors from green to yellow. These late season Thompson will be some of the sweetest green grapes you ever eat.

The Stennes grew the Dapple Dandy pluots in your box today. Like many of our organic growers, the Stennes family farm in Washington’s Cascade Mountains is a family affair. The farm began in 1894, when the Stennes family emmigrated from Norway and planted apple trees on their homestead. Now, Keith is joined by his twin sons, Mark and Kevin to make up the third and fourth generations of Stennes farmers. They have grown the orchard to include not just apples, but also cherries, pluots, plums, pears. Soon we will see various apple and pear varieties from them. Honeycrisp apples are just around the corner and then Concorde pears a couple of favorites. 

Health and Wellness

Our philosophy of having a certain fruit like blueberries, cherries, grapes, pluots, Colorado peaches etc in the box more than once or twice in a row is as follows.  We pick the windows of time when each fruit is great and peaking.  They are a very high value crops and appreciated by most so we really want to get them to you while they are happening.  Blueberries are all done now until next June and I miss eating 1-3 pints a day, as I do during the season.  The cherries and peaches are the same way.  They are such a short window all year that we try to put the focus on that fruit which is really at its prime.  Cherries are now done and gone and I will miss them until next July.  Colorado peaches will wrap up in Mid September and then apples and pears start coming on strong.  You get your first taste of new crop apples today.  I know this can be difficult to understand when you can find fruit all year round now in the stores, but just think of the apples that are in the stores now from Chile, Argentina, New Zealand.  These apples are over 8 months old and you will see them in the stores into February when they are over a year old! We work hard to keep a good mix of fruit in your box, but I am always conscious of keeping it in season and at its peak.  Thank you so much for your continued support.

Recipe

Rustic Gingered Peach Tart

Heat oven to 400°F.

Combine 4 medium peeled, pitted, and sliced peaches; 1/4 cup sugar; and 1/4 tsp ground ginger in medium skillet. Cook over medium-high heat, stirring gently, until sugar dissolves, about 3 minutes. Let cool slightly.

Place a store-bought 9″ piecrust on baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Mound peaches in center. Fold edges up and over filling, leaving center exposed.

Sprinkle with 1 Tbsp sugar and bake until golden brown, about 30 minutes. Serves 6.

Nutrition (per serving): 227 cal, 2 g pro, 36 g carb, 1 g fiber, 9.5 g fat, 4 g sat fat, 187 mg sodium

Courtesy of Prevention Magazine

 

Chilled Peach Shooters

Combine 1/4 cup honey, 3 Tbsp fresh lemon juice, 12 ice cubes, and 3 medium peeled, pitted, and sliced peaches in blender. Puree until smooth.

Pour into 8 shot glasses and garnish each with a peach slice. Serves 8.

Nutrition (per serving): 55 cal, 1 g pro, 15 g carb, 1 g fiber, 0 g fat, 0 g sat fat, 1 mg sodium

Courtesy of Prevention Magazine

Do you have a favorite recipe or comment you want to share? Become a fan on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/FruitShareOrganics?fref=ts), follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/FruitShare), and check out our blog (FruitShare.wordpress.com) pages. Good old-fashioned email works, too, at comments@FruitShare.com

Welcome to the 6th Fruit Delivery of 2014; Aug 27 & 28

Many of you may not be aware of the “Dirty Dozen” list of fruits. These are conventional fruits that have many chemicals in and on them.  Pesticide residue testing by the U.S. Department of Agriculture has repeatedly found that fruits such as apples, grapes, peaches, nectarines and berries show chemical residue when tested and consistently rank in the top 5 with pesticide residue. We only bring you organic fruit because of our focus on heathy people and a healthy planet. Organic fruit is grown with a lot of knowledge and attention to detail – paying attention to nature’s cues – thus avoiding the use of toxic chemicals.  Enjoy your fruit knowing it is full of vitamins, minerals, fiber and flavor that will keep you strong and energized throughout your day.

To Your Health!

Everett Myers, Founder of FruitShare™

In Your Box:

Thompson grapes and Flame red grapes

Yellow nectarines, Colorado peaches

Flavor Grenade and Honey Punch pluots

Valencia oranges

 

 

Storage and Ripening

Store your grapes in the coldest part of the refrigerator. Only wash them right before you eat them, as moisture can contribute to molding. If the grapes arrive damp take them out of their package and dry them off with a paper towel and then put them back in their bag and refrigerate.  Keep your nectarines and peaches out on the counter at room temperature until they give to gentle thumb pressure. Watch carefully, some might be ready to eat right out of the box. Once they give to thumb pressure you can refrigerate them too, which lets you enjoy them over a longer period of time. Keep your pluots in the refrigerator for a crisp, cool treat on warm summer days. Your Valencia oranges can be kept in the refrigerator and enjoyed sliced as a cross section and squeezed into a glass fiber and all . . . refreshing.
What It Takes

We are very fortunate to be including some Colorado Peaches in this week’s box! Brant and Carol are firm in their commitment to good land stewardship. They use a blend of old and new technology to keep their soil fertile, control pests, and keep their trees healthy and productive. One of their most successful techniques is simply being observant. Brant claims that if you are in your orchard all the time, and you really know your orchard, it’s possible to detect potential problems and nip them in the bud. It is the care that the whole Harrison family puts into their peaches that sets them apart. At their orchard on the western slopes of Colorado’s Rocky Mountains, it is a family affair. The whole family including their sons, parents and nephews, work side by side to grow these excellent peaches.  The mountainous location and unique climate of their farm make it perfect for growing delicious peaches. At almost 4800 ft. in elevation, the orchard’s water supply comes from melting snowpack high in the Rockies. This snowmelt joins the Colorado River and flows down the slope of Grand Mesa where the Brant and Carol tap into it to irrigate their orchards. The hot days and cool nights in their river valley bring the peaches to the peak of flavor and juiciness. Eat these quickly they are tree ripe and will be ready to eat when you get them or within just a day or two. They are delicious alone or sliced and served with any breakfast, cereal, waffles, pancakes. If they are getting to soft for you, wash the peach fuzz off of them, then slice them off the pit and put them in a freezer bag. We like to use these frozen peaches in a smoothie. They are also great for baking and grilling. Enjoy!

What is a pluot? The pluot is a fruit that has revolutionized the plum world. It was developed by the famous plant breeder Floyd Zaiger of Modesto, CA. Floyd crossed plums with apricots to come up with the great tasting and beautiful pluot. The pluot is made up of 70-75% plum and 25-30% apricot. Over the years many different variations of the pluot have been grown. Today we include a couple of the most flavorful varieties. The Flavor Grenade is red green and yellow and sweet and juicy. The Honey Punch is more purple colored and is very juicy and mild. Enjoy both of these varieties. They are ready to eat and will keep well in the refrigerator. We don’t wait for these to become soft like you would a plum

The pluots are from Cecelia at Wild River. Located on the banks of the Yuba River in California, exceptional fruit has been grown at Wild River since 1979. In 1991, they transitioned to organic growing practices. At Wild River, they say their success stems from the water, which comes from the melted Sierra Nevada snowpack and is clean, high-quality irrigation for the orchards.

The Flames and Thompson grapes this week are from Three Sisters Farm, owned by Joe and Johnni. Located near Fresno, CA, they use beneficial grasses and flowers – especially poppies – as cover crops, making their vineyard exceptionally beautiful. Three Sisters has been certified organic since 1981, but even before Joe and Johnni began farming, Joe’s parents owned the farm. Some of the vines are over 80 years old!

John’s organic Valencia oranges, grown in Fillmore, CA, are at their peak in June, July and August. Unlike the more familiar navel oranges that flavor up in winter, Valencia oranges hit their stride in summer. We love their sweet-tart juicy flavor during these hot summer days. Valencia oranges are thin-skinned and juicy, perfect for squeezing a morning glass of orange juice. They also make a delicious snack; rather than trying to peel the thin skin, slice Valencias with the skin on and enjoy them as sweetly tart wedges. We recommend storing Valencia oranges in the refrigerator so the skin doesn’t dry out.

We continue to get rave customer reviews about the nectarines from Mike Van Pelt and Jim Morford in Washington State. They have nearly 180 acres of apples, pears, peaches and nectarines. They converted to organic farming about 10 years ago and continue to produce amazing fruit to this day. Part of their secret is training their employees in careful handling and packaging practices. They are experienced farmers who provide knowledge to the seasonal employees by sharing their expertise. With the benefit of that skill, Mike and Jim consistently provide fruit that is healthy, flavorful and totally delicious!

Health and Wellness

This time of year is peak peach season, and that’s good news – not just because they are so delicious, but because nectarines and peaches are incredibly nutritious. Like most fruits, peaches offer plenty of nutrients, but they have a few extra tricks hidden in their juicy sweetness. For starters, nectarines and peaches are a great source of potassium. If you have a potassium deficiency, you’ll might experience fatigue, anxiety, muscle weakness, skin problems, poor memory, hypertension, or even heart problems. Good thing there’s such a tasty source of potassium in this week’s box of nectarines! Nectarines and Peaches also contain plenty of beta carotene, an antioxidant most often associated with carrots. Your body converts beta carotene into vitamin A, which is an essential vitamin for supporting healthy eyes and heart. Lycopene and lutein are two more antioxidants found in peaches, and studies show that both may help prevent heart disease and cancer. These three major antioxidants are also what give peaches their rich yellow-orange coloring. Nectarines and Peaches contain high levels of iron, too, which is necessary for improving metabolism, regulating body temperature, creating antibodies, and making neurotransmitters and hemoglobin. Nectarines and Peaches are also high in vitamin C, fiber and water. Recent studies are even beginning to find that peaches contain antioxidants called polyphenols that may even help prevent breast cancer. No wonder nectarines and peaches are known as superfoods, joining the ranks alongside blueberries and cherries!
Recipe

Spiced and Carrot Bread Recipe (Nectarines can be used)

3/4 cup chopped pecans
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 1/2 cups peeled and chopped fresh, ripe peaches
3/4 cup freshly grated carrots
2/3 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup milk
2 large eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat oven to 350°. Bake pecans in a single layer in a shallow pan 8 to 10 minutes or until toasted and fragrant, stirring halfway through. Cool 15 minutes. Stir together flour and next 6 ingredients in a large bowl; add peaches, next 4 ingredients, and toasted pecans, stirring just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon batter into a lightly greased 9- x 5-inch loaf pan. Bake at 350° for 1 hour and 5 minutes to 1 hour and 10 minutes or until a long wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in pan on a wire rack 5 minutes. Remove from pan to wire rack, and cool completely (about 1 hour).Courtesy of Southern Living

Do you have a favorite recipe or comment you want to share? Become a fan on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/FruitShareOrganics?fref=ts), follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/FruitShare), and check out our blog (FruitShare.wordpress.com) pages. Good old-fashioned email works, too, at comments@FruitShare.com, or by phone at 651-644-2800.

Welcome to the 5th Fruit Delivery of 2014; Aug 13 & 14

We’ve all heard that obesity in the U.S. is at an all-time high and increasing, especially in children. Experts agree that we eat too much sugar, which is contributing to this phenomenon. So, if we’re eating too much sugar, does that mean that we need to be concerned about the sugar in fruit? An article in the New York Times explains that “sugar consumed in fruit is not linked to any adverse health effects, no matter how much you eat.” In fact, the article continues, “increased fruit consumption is tied to lower body weight and a lower risk of obesity-associated diseases.”

Why is that? It all comes down to fiber. Because sugars are contained within fruit cells, “it takes time for the digestive tract to break down those cells. The sugars therefore enter the bloodstream slowly, giving the liver more time to metabolize them.” That means your blood sugar doesn’t spike, and your body works to break down fruit slowly, so that you feel satisfied, longer. Need proof? “Unlike processed foods, which are usually digested in the first few feet of our intestines, fiber-rich fruit breaks down more slowly so it travels far longer through the digestive tract, triggering the satiety hormones that tend to cluster further down the small intestines,” according to Dr. David Ludwig, the director of the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Paste this link into your browser to read the full article and find out more about why eating fruit is truly one of the best things you can eat for a healthy diet, healthy weight and healthy life! http://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/well/2013/07/31/making-the-case-for-eating-fruit/?hpw=&

To Your Health!

Everett Myers, Founder of FruitShare™

In Your Box

Thompson green grapes and or Flame red grapes

yellow peaches

Dapple Dandy, Flavor Queen and Flavor Grenade pluots

Valencia oranges

 

Storage and Ripening

Store your grapes in the coldest part of the refrigerator. Only wash them right before you eat them, as moisture can contribute to molding. If the grapes arrive damp take them out of their package and dry them off with a paper towel and then put them back in their bag and refrigerate.  Keep your peaches out on the counter at room temperature until they give to gentle thumb pressure. Watch carefully, some might be ready to eat right out of the box. Once they give to thumb pressure you can refrigerate them too, which lets you enjoy them over a longer period of time. Keep your pluots in the refrigerator for a crisp, cool treat on warm summer days. Your Valencia oranges can be kept in the refrigerator and enjoyed sliced as a cross section and squeezed into a glass fiber and all . . . refreshing.

What It Takes

What is a pluot? The pluot is a fruit that has revolutionized the plum world. It was developed by the famous plant breeder Floyd Zaiger of Modesto, CA. Floyd crossed plums with apricots to come up with the great tasting and beautiful pluot. The pluot is made up of 70-75% plum and 25-30% apricot. Over the years many different variations of the pluot have been grown. Some of our favorite 3 varieties are in your box today. They are called called Dapple Dandy, Flavor Queen and Flavor Grenade. The Flavor Queens are yellow-green pluots and are a bit more unusual than their red or purple relatives. When ripe, it should be very juicy, with golden flesh. Part of the reason this variety is hard to find is that it has delicate skin. Don’t be deceived by this cosmetic damage, fruit with a few brown scuffs will taste great! The Dapple Dandy are the most common with their dappled skin and the Flavor Grenade have a fun green, yellow and reddish blush that make for superb eating too. We like them all. What are your favorites?

The pluots are from Cecelia at Wild River. Located on the banks of the Yuba River in California, exceptional fruit has been grown at Wild River since 1979. In 1991, they transitioned to organic growing practices. At Wild River, they say their success stems from the water, which comes from the melted Sierra Nevada snowpack and is clean, high-quality irrigation for the orchards.

The Thompson green and Flames grapes this week are from Three Sisters Farm, owned by Joe and Johnni. Located near Fresno, CA, they use beneficial grasses and flowers – especially poppies – as cover crops, making their vineyard exceptionally beautiful. Three Sisters has been certified organic since 1981, but even before Joe and Johnni began farming, Joe’s parents owned the farm. Some of the vines are over 80 years old! Joe and Johnni grew the specialty Champagne grapes that you may have enjoyed in your box over the previous 2 weeks.

Yellow Peaches are from Mike Van Pelt and Jim Morford in Washington State. They have nearly 180 acres of apples, pears, peaches and nectarines. They converted to organic farming about 10 years ago and continue to produce amazing fruit to this day. Part of their secret is training their employees in careful handling and packaging practices. They are experienced farmers, who provide knowledge to the seasonal employees by sharing their expertise. With the benefit of that skill, Mike and Jim consistently provide fruit that is healthy, flavorful and totally delicious. Be ready to eat these right away. They give to thumb pressure quickly showing just how they are picked at their peak of flavor.

We also got a small batch of the first Colorado peaches to come off the trees this week. We were lucky enough to get a few of these in your box as well. Look for more Colorado peaches as more and more of them come off the trees over the next 2-4 weeks.

Health and Wellness

August can be a busy time as summer comes to an end and we get ready to go back to school. Keep yourself stress-free during this busy time by remembering to take time to enjoy the end of summer. Take a walk with your family or enjoy a sweet pluot outside after dinner. Making sure to set aside time for yourself and your family will ensure that even during this busy time, you’ll keep your stress levels down and even enjoy the rest of summer!

Recipe

Summer Peach Pie Crumble (of course you can substitute nectarines and pluots here too)

1/4 cup rolled oats (25g)

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1/8 tsp plus 1/16 tsp salt

1/4 tsp baking soda

2 tbsp sugar or agave

2 1/2 tbsp coconut flour

6 loosely-packed cups sliced peaches

Optional: 3 tbsp oil or melted butter spread

1 1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract
Preheat oven to 380 F and grease an 8×8 pan. Combine all dry ingredients in a bowl, and stir very well. Put peaches in a separate large bowl, add the vanilla extract and optional fat source, and stir to coat. Now evenly disperse the crumble on top of the peaches, and stir until it’s as evenly coated as possible. Pour into the pan, and cook 50-60 minutes, opening the oven after 30 minutes to turn the peaches (so all sides cook evenly).

Courtesy of chocolatecoveredkatie.com/
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Welcome to the 4th Fruit Delivery of 2014; July 30 & 31

I am fortunate to work directly with so many fantastic fruit growers. Many are 3rd, 4th and even 5th generation growers who grew up on the farms they currently work and who have a direct connection with their customers. With my many visits to orchards I am always struck by each grower’s attention to detail. They give much thought and care to producing the best tasting organic fruit all the while maintaining their concern for the environment, their employees and their customers. These direct personal connections and the stories we share with you are intended to give you the greatest confidence and trust in where and how your fruit was grown.

Last week a voluntary recall of stone fruit was made by Wawona Packing Company based on a positive test for Listeria monocytogenes. I can assure you that FruitShare has not purchased any fruit from Wawona. They sell to large establishments like Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, Costco, Walmart, Wegman’s, Kroger’s, Food 4 Less among others. Thankfully no one has become ill from their fruit and Wawona worked hard to get the word out and correct the issue with their customers.

Enjoy another delicious box. The summer fruit season is short.

To Your Health

Everett Myers, Founder of FruitShare™

 

In Your Box

Flame grapes

Summer Bright nectarines

Bluecrop blueberries

Dapple Dandy pluots

Valencia oranges

Champagne grapes!!!

Coming soon: Colorado peaches

Storage and Ripening

Keep all of the fruit in your refrigerator except for your nectarines. The nectarines will be ready to eat when the flesh gives to gentle thumb pressure. Keep the grapes and blueberries in the coldest part of the refrigerator. Only wash your grapes and blueberries just before eating them, as moisture can lead to mold due to the high sugar content in these grapes and blueberries. Blueberries can be easily poured into a zip lock bag and frozen. After fruit is frozen, we like to use it in smoothies, no sugar necessary because they are so sweet on their own. Remember to check your fruit bowl every day and enjoy what is ready. Placing any of the fruit in the refrigerator will give you more days to enjoy it, but don’t forget about it – you want to enjoy each piece at its prime. Pluots many people like crispier if this is the case for you put them in the refrigerator right away. The Valencia oranges will keep best in the fridge too.

What It Takes

Three Sisters Farm, owned by Joe and Johnni Soghomonian, is famous for their champagne grapes. Located near Fresno, CA, they use beneficial grasses and flowers – especially poppies – as cover crops, making their vineyard exceptionally beautiful. Three Sisters has been certified organic since 1981, but even before Joe and Johnni began farming, Joe’s parents owned the farm. Some of the vines are over 80 years old and are still producing champagne grapes! You might be wondering, what exactly is a champagne grape? Believe it or not, champagne grapes are not used to make champagne. Those grapes only come from the Champagne region of France, whereas champagne grapes come from all over. Champagne grapes are technically called Black Corinth grapes, and they are tiny, seedless grapes – smaller than your pinkie fingernail – they are one of the oldest cultivated foods in the world! When dried, champagne grapes are called Zante currants. They are perfect for snacking, and they have less crunch than other table grapes. Because they are so small, some people even eat the stems and all! The tiny, dark red grapes also make for beautiful edible centerpieces, but eat them quickly because they don’t last long outside of refrigeration. Joe and Johnni also grew these delicious Flame grapes, Enjoy.

Your blueberries were grown by 5th generation farmer Angelica Hayton.  She began selling the berries in a little stand at the end of her driveway when she was in 5th grade. In 2001, when she was old enough to drive, she started bringing berries to Pike Place Market and soon more farmers markets followed.  As each preceding generation passes the farm to the next, so too passes the responsibility of continuing sustainability, adaptation, and tradition. Growing foods organically has been a passion for her. It was important to Angelica that Hayton Farms supply the markets with the best possible product, and for them that means organic produce.

When I first visited Rob’s orchard and packing shed near Wenatchee, WA 5 years ago I was impressed with how great attention to detail was in every aspect of the orchard. Instead of picking stone fruit into bins like many large orchards do. Rob came up with the idea of hand picking directly into 2-gallon pails. The pails are then stacked in bins and moved to the packing line where the fruit is packed directly from the pail into the boxes. Rob discovered he could harvest the stone fruit closer to the thumb pressure give point and get us sweeter juicier nectarines. Rob keeps trying new things in the orchard and his packing shed every year to get us the most delicious fruit nature will provide. You can enjoy his nectarines with confidence knowing that Rob’s family has been in the agricultural business since 1921, with Rob representing the third generation of orchardists.

The Valencia oranges this week again come from John at Sespe Creek. The Valencia oranges are super juicy and with their sweet-tart flavor, they are perfect for squeezing a glass of fresh orange juice. One orange sliced in half and squeezed will typically fill a 4 to 8 oz glass. They also make a great snack, but can be difficult to peel, so your best bet is to slice Valencia’s into wedges. We recommend storing the oranges in the refrigerator so the skin does not dry out, but it’s okay to leave them on the counter if you prefer your citrus at room temperature. Valencia oranges are at their peak in the summer unlike most citrus. They’re fresh juice is refreshing a great treat in salad dressing, summer barbeques and spritzer drinks

Health and Wellness

Did you know that 1 in 3 people will develop cancer in their lifetime? That’s a big number. But did you know that there is an emerging movement to tackle cancer simply by eating the right kinds of foods? The idea is to “starve cancer” by eating healthy, flavorful foods that work against a process called angiogenesis, which is the way microscopic cancers gain blood supply. By eating to starve cancer, you can help prevent cancers from beginning to grow in your body. Some of the fruits that do work to stave off cancer include: apples; blueberries; cherries; cranberries; grapefruit; nectarines; oranges; peaches; and grapes; to name a few. Read more at www.eattodefeat.org.

Recipe

Summer Peach Pie Crumble (of course you can substitute nectarines, pluots and even blueberries here too)

1/4 cup rolled oats (25g)

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1/8 tsp plus 1/16 tsp salt

1/4 tsp baking soda

2 tbsp sugar or agave

2 1/2 tbsp coconut flour

6 loosely-packed cups sliced peaches

Optional: 3 tbsp oil or melted butter spread

1 1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract
Preheat oven to 380 F and grease an 8×8 pan. Combine all dry ingredients in a bowl, and stir very well. Put peaches in a separate large bowl, add the vanilla extract and optional fat source, and stir to coat. Now evenly disperse the crumble on top of the peaches, and stir until it’s as evenly coated as possible. Pour into the pan, and cook 50-60 minutes, opening the oven after 30 minutes to turn the peaches (so all sides cook evenly).

Courtesy of chocolatecoveredkatie.com/

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Welcome to the 3rd Fruit Delivery of 2014; July 16 & 17

While many of us were enjoying our 4th of July holiday, our growers were working day and night to bring in the cherry, blueberry and peach harvest. Enjoy the Red (cherries), Blue (blueberries) and White (peaches)!

To Your Health

Everett Myers, Founder of FruitShare™

 

In Your Box

Lapin Cherries

Summertime yellow peach

Spring Snow white peach

Valencia oranges

Duke blueberries

Mariposa plums

and Flavor King pluots!!!

Storage and Ripening

Keep all of the fruit except the cherries, oranges and blueberries on the counter at room temperature. The stone fruit will be ready to eat when the flesh gives to gentle thumb pressure. Don’t wait too long peaches will be best eaten right when they give to thumb pressure.  Keep the cherries, oranges and blueberries in the coldest part of the refrigerator. Only wash your cherries and blueberries just before eating them, as moisture can lead to mold due to the high sugar content in these cherries and blueberries. Peaches are great sliced up on anything for breakfast or you can slice them and place in a freezer bag to freeze.  Blueberries can be easily poured into a zip lock bag and frozen and you can also pit cherries and freeze them. After fruit is frozen, we like to use it in smoothies, no sugar necessary because they are so sweet on their own.  Remember to check your fruit bowl every day and enjoy what is ready.  Placing any of the fruit in the refrigerator will give you more days to enjoy it, but don’t forget about it – you want to enjoy each piece at its prime!

What It Takes

Your incredible Lapin cherries are grown by Apple and George.  They have been growing organically for over 30 years, and they believe firmly in the benefits of organic agriculture. When they bought their current orchard in 1997, the crops were already planted and pesticides were present. Over the next few years, Apple and George slowly transitioned the land back to its natural, organic state, enduring tough harvests and learning loads. They haven’t looked back. Now, George enjoys the simple pleasure of watching folks eat the cherries he and his wife grew on their central-Washington farm. Apple, the self-professed philosophical spouse, loves being part of a bigger movement and of course providing some of the healthiest, tastiest food grown today.

Since transitioning their orchard to organic, Apple and George have harvested some of our favorite fruit of the summer year after year. They employ about 40 seasonal workers, who work in an environment free of harsh chemicals alongside Apple and George, their three grown children plus their significant others. Harvest days began at 2:00 AM, with head lamps this year, and packing went on until 9:00 PM. The orchard is only 3.5 acres large, but the small size allows for plenty of care. The cherries are hand-selected, so you know that the cherries in your box are truly at their peak of ripeness. Sometimes Apple, George and their team of harvesters sweep through the orchard on four separate occasions.

Bill Zirkle’s ancestors first moved from the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia to Eastern Washington and began growing fruit shortly after the civil war.  Zirkle Fruit has been family owned ever since. As a result, there have been many lessons about growing fruit passed down from one generation to the next.

“My father Lester pushed the importance of quality. He always told me to grow quality fruit first, last, and always. People are always looking for an excellent piece of good quality eating fruit. You’ll always be successful if you work hard but smart. Grow the right thing and be willing to change. Find out what people’s desires, wants, and preferences are, and grow to their needs rather than try to sell them what you have.”

When asked how Bill has had success growing the family orchard. Bill replied “Our philosophy is pretty simple: find good people, pay them well and treat them like you would like to be treated.”  Bill’s son Mark now runs the family fruit business which they market under the Rainier name.

The quality of these berries are obviously grown and packed with a lot of love and attention to detail. We are thankful that Bill listened to his father and Mark is listening to his dad to bring us such tasty blueberries.

When you talk with Greg you understand how strongly he believes in growing fruit organically and doing the small things that make your peaches taste great.  He and his family have been growing organic fruit for over 20 years.  He loves having his family share his passion of harvesting the best fruit nature will provide us.  Knowing where your food comes from and that it has been grown in a healthy and sustainable way is what motivates Greg and his family Rosalie, Erin, John and Jay.  We are fortunate to get their peaches this week.

John at Sespe grows these incredibly juicy Valencia oranges that make the perfect cup of juice.  The valencias have skin scaring that can happen since there are no fungicides and petroleum based waxes used in organic production.  The scaring won’t affect the taste of the fruit.  Cut these in half with the stem and bottom ends facing the side (cross section) and squeeze into a class.  These are so loaded with juice that one will fill the glass.  Drink up directly or added to season a grilled dish or if you are so inclined a refreshing spritzer.  Valencia’s are the rare summer orange and at their peak now.

Health and Wellness
We all know that sitting around all day is bad, and that we should exercise to stay healthy. It is recommended that we exercise for 30 to 60 minutes five times per week, plus two to three weekly resistance training sessions, like weightlifting. That seems like plenty of exercise…right? A new study discussed in the Washington Post finds that our sedentary lifestyles are harmful for our health, even if you are meeting the recommended guidelines for exercise. The study, from the American College of Sports Medicine, is still very new and results are still being analyzed. However, it seems clear that no matter how much you exercise, sitting for prolonged periods of time can still harm your health. If you sit at a desk all day or drive long distances, you are probably at a higher risk of heart disease and diabetes. So what’s the solution? Based on the preliminary evidence, the way to counteract the negative effects of sitting still for long periods of time is simple: get up. Carol Ewing Garber, associate professor of movement science at Columbia University, recommends moving around every 30 to 60 minutes – “get up while you’re talking on the phone, just for a minute or two,” she recommends. Taking short breaks to move around and stretch out is good for your focus, too. So, get up, shake it out, and take a breather; it could be a powerful way to stay healthy.

Recipe
Flourless Anything Crumble

This recipe is great with stone fruit and berries

4 cups fruit peeled and sliced (peaches, blueberries, plums, pluots, cherries or whatever is in season)

4 tablespoons maple syrup

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

½ cup almond meal

½ cup quinoa flakes

A pinch of sea salt

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

 

Preheat oven to 400 degree F

Toss the fruit in a shallow baking dish with 2 tablespoons of the maple syrup and the lemon juice.  Mix the almond meal, quinoa flakes, salt, and cinnamon in a large bowl.  Add the 2 remaining tablespoons of maple syrup and the olive oil and mix until just combined.  Crumble the mixture over the fruit and bake until the topping is browned and thefruit is bubbling, 20-25 minutes.

Recipe compliment of Gwyneth Paltrow and Julia Turshen “It’s All Good” cookbook.

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